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Family Immigration Archives

Removing conditions from a green card based on marriage

Foreigners in Pennsylvania who have conditions on their permanent residence status based on marriage may have those conditions removed after two years. A person who marries a U.S. citizen and becomes a permanent resident must wait two years to have conditions removed so that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services can be sure that the marriage was not fraudulent.

If I marry a U.S. Citizen can I apply for a marriage-based visa?

Individuals who have married an American citizen may apply for marriage-based visas in addition to other pathways to legal residency. There are specific requirements for each type of benefit for which petitioners apply.

Extreme workload for non-profits assisting minor immigrants

Those who work with Pennsylvania non-profit agencies may understand the stresses facing organizations in Miami as they attempt to reunite young immigrants with their families. The flow of children from Central American countries into the United States has consistently increased in the last two years, resulting in heavy workloads for relevant non-profits. Organizations now often lack the funding to pay the workers needed to handle the increasing demand for their services. Layoffs have affected some of these organizations, and in many cases, workers put in a significant amount of unpaid hours.

Immigration issue with minors complicated because of safety

The U.S. has had an issue with illegal immigration for years. Whether the entrants are from Mexico, Cuba or another country, arriving in this country via illegal means can cause all sorts of complications for everyone involved. Recently, there has been an influx of illegal immigrants, but with a twist; the immigrants are all minors. Although Lancaster is hundreds of miles from the borders in question, many of the families these children are trying to reach can be found throughout the country.

Speedier naturalization through U.S. citizen spouses

When U.S. citizens marry foreign nationals, their spouse does not automatically acquire U.S. citizenship. Most of us in Reading realize this. Having a U.S. citizen as a family member, however, can make the naturalization process a lot quicker. Unlike most immigrants who must spend five years as U.S. permanent residents before they can apply for naturalization, foreign nationals who are married to U.S. citizens need only spend three years as permanent residents before applying.

Recent Supreme Court decision may force immigrant families apart

For those people in Lancaster who have never had to deal with the immigration system, they may think that everyone's applications are processed relatively quickly and that there isn't much wait to get an immigrant visa and, eventually, be approved for citizenship. Anyone who has dealt with the immigration system, however, is well aware that this is far from true. For some immigrants, depending on where they are from, they could wait years in the U.S. on a nonimmigrant visa before they are granted permanent residency.

Why would Americans need to sponsor immigrant siblings?

It may seem counterintuitive, but not all siblings share the same citizenship and one may need to sponsor the other for a green card. Although many people in Lancaster likely do share the same citizenship, whether American or otherwise, there are some who don't and want to bring their siblings to the country. As with any other family member being sponsored for permanent residency, there are specific requirements that must be met.

Overworked immigration officials are delaying on green cards

We have spoken extensively about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that President Obama started in 2012. This program allowed young people who were brought to the country outside of the immigration system to receive a work permit and a deferral from deportation. The program has worked well and many immigrants appreciate the work the president has done on behalf of this large group of immigrants (although many also don't think he has gone far enough), but it has also had some unforeseen consequences.

Immigrant family members in difficult spot

When someone from Lancaster County joins the military, most people are grateful for his or her service. The sacrifices he or she makes benefit us all. Yet for members of the military and veterans who have immediate family members who are immigrants without a legal status, the fear is that the same country they are fighting to protect could be deporting their loved ones.