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October 2014 Archives

How people who are seeking U.S. citizenship can avoid scams

While the pathway to U.S. citizenship may be a lengthy and somewhat difficult process, it can become even more complicated for immigrants in Pennsylvania and throughout the country who fall prey to several common scams that claim to make the process easier and quicker. Such offers from the radio, websites and newspaper advertisements, for example, may appear tempting, but they are illegal and can actually do more harm than good.

If I marry a U.S. Citizen can I apply for a marriage-based visa?

Individuals who have married an American citizen may apply for marriage-based visas in addition to other pathways to legal residency. There are specific requirements for each type of benefit for which petitioners apply.

Steps to becoming a U.S. citizen

Many Pennsylvania residents seek to become U.S. citizens each year. In order to become a citizen of the United States, a person must meet specific criteria. For someone to become a U.S. citizen at birth, he or she much have either been born in the United States or specific territories or possessions, or have at least one parent who was a citizen at the time of the person's birth.

Employment immigration in Pennsylvania

Attracting and retaining qualified employees can be a challenge at times, making the ability to seek candidates from a foreign setting advantageous in some situations. Similarly, foreign candidates for jobs may find unique opportunities available in the United States. In either case, assistance may be necessary in seeking appropriate permissions for work and residency in the country. The application process can be challenging, and errors could waste time or result in the wrong classifications.

What are the qualifications for asylum?

Individuals applying for asylum in Pennsylvania must meet certain burdens established by statute and enforced by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The general rule is that any alien may apply for asylum as long as he or she is physically present in the U.S. That rule is subject to exceptions in some cases for individuals who fail to apply within one year of arrival, who have been previously denied asylum or who may be removed to a safe third country. There are further exceptions based on the prior conduct, perceived danger or other attributes of the applicant.