Even if you’re legally permitted to reside in the United States, such as if you have a work visa, deportation is always a concern. And it’s safe to say that the same holds true for people who are living illegally in the country.

Regardless of your situation, understanding the most common reasons for deportation and how the legal system works can help you protect your rights. By doing so, you minimize the risk of deportation, thus allowing you to stay in the United States.

Here are some of the most common reasons for deportation:

  • Committing a crime: The more serious the crime, the more likely it is that you’ll face issues in regard to your status in the United States. For example, an aggravated felony is more serious than a traffic violation.
  • Failure to obey the terms and conditions of your status: For instance, if you’re in the United States on a work visa, there are things you are and are not permitted to do. Understanding the terms and conditions of your status will help you prevent trouble.
  • Violating immigration laws: There are a variety of immigration laws that are easy to violate if you don’t know what you’re doing. These include but are not limited to smuggling illegal aliens into the United States, falsifying documents or participating in a fraudulent marriage to gain residency.
  • Failure to disclose an address change: If you’re changing addresses for any reason, such as a job relocation, you’re required by law to submit the proper notification to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office. It may not sound serious, but it’s a common reason for deportation.

Just because you receive a notice of deportation from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll have to leave the country. It’s not something you want to deal with, but there are steps you can take to protect and defend your rights.

Regardless of why you’re faced with deportation, don’t give up easily. Devise a plan, carry it out and do whatever you can to prove that you should be able to remain in the United States.