Three federal judges all ruled against proposed immigration laws written by the White House on September 27. Seemingly trying every trick in the book, Donald Trump and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) keep trying to find ways to make migrants feel unwelcome. Fortunately, people in the United States have certain rights protected by the law.

Fast-tracking not allowed

Initially announced in July, the White House proposed that the DHS could quickly deport anyone who has been in the country illegally for less than two years. Already used for migrants caught crossing the southern border illegally, the policy was not enacted elsewhere before it was challenged in court.

A judge in Washington ruled that the White House’s “expedited removal” violated procedural requirements. This included:

  • Migrants would not be able to see a judge before deportation
  • There were no translators provided to detainees
  • Legal immigrants could be mistakenly deported

Endless detainment for families stopped

Another judge in Los Angeles ruled that the DHS could not indefinitely hold detained migrant children who came with their parents. This law would have contradicted the Flores Act of 1997 that said that children caught illegally crossing the border should be given to relatives in the United States as soon as possible. Also, they could only be in camps or facilities that were officially licensed to host families.

ICE can’t just rely on database

In another court in Los Angeles this same day, a federal judge ruled that ICE can’t just use databases known to make mistakes in identifying migrants who entered the country illegally. They will need to find other sources to confirm that information before making arrests.

Laws are for everyone

These three rulings are a clear example of how the White House cannot bully the courts. Laws protect the innocent and vulnerable, no matter how hard the Trump administration tries to prove otherwise. Those who have questions about these three rulings or other immigration matters may want to talk to an attorney who handles immigration law. These professionals can help legally protect migrants and legal citizens from those who wish to violate their rights.