To avoid deportation, you might need to show extreme hardship. Most removals will cause difficulties, but you will need to show it will create issues that are more serious than normal. This can mean situations where deportation will cause problems for your loved ones.

Hardship in waivers is usually there to protect your family members, known as Qualifying Relatives (QR). It depends on the type of waiver you apply for, but the QR could be your spouse, parent or children. You will need to show specific trouble that your QR will go through if you don’t get a waiver. You can also show how the pain this causes the QR can hurt other family members.

Causes of hardship

There are many ways you can show hardship:

  • Ties: You could show strong family times as a hardship if your QR does not have much other family. You may have a case if they rely on you as a caregiver, or for money or emotional support. The QR’s age and how long they have been in the U.S. can all be a part of the decision.
  • Impacts: There can be serious results if you are not around to help your QR. Difficult language and cultural hurdles can be tough to manage with you not there. It can also be hard for them to keep their quality of living without help finding work, handling property and paying large costs.
  • Care: The health of your QR can make a big difference. Any medical help that they might have trouble getting when you are gone can count. The mental stress that they can experience if you don’t get a waiver could also qualify.
  • Conditions: You can also make a case if your QR will have to go with you for relocation to a place that could put them in danger. A place with ongoing rioting, U.S. military action and natural disasters could all be reasons that mean hardships.

Avoiding deportation might be what is best for you and your family. Proving this can look many different ways. Make sure you know what counts as hardship, and you might be able to interrupt deportation.