How can you bring your parents to America?

On Behalf of | Mar 1, 2021 | Citizenship

If you’ve been living in the United States, then you may want to bring your parents to live here as well. In most cases, it’s possible to do so. However, you will need to make sure you follow the steps set by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services closely.

To start with, you will need to file a petition for your parents to come to the United States. However, there is a catch. You must be over 21 and need to be a U.S. citizen if you want them to come as Green Card holders. As of March 2021, you cannot petition to bring your parents to live in the United States permanently if you are only a permanent resident.

What do you need to do to bring your parents to the United States?

If you have decided to bring your mom or dad to the United States, you will need to fill out form I-130 and present your birth certificate with their names. You will also have to show a copy of your U.S. passport if you are American but were born outside of the country. If you went through naturalization, then submit a duplicate of the naturalization certificate.

For your father, there is one difference. You will also need to submit a copy of your parents’ marriage certificate. If you were born when your parents were not married and were not legitimated, then you will need to show evidence that you and your father have a relationship that started before you were 21 or got married. That bond can be financial or emotional. For those who were legitimated before turning 18, proof of that legitimization is necessary.

Can you bring your step-parents to the United States?

In most cases, yes. You’ll need your step-parents’ marriage certificate to show that they married your mother or father before you turned 18. You will also need copies of the divorce decrees from their previous marriages and your birth certificate.

Form I-130 is used for all of these actions. It can be complicated to fill out these documents and include all the needed information, so if you need assistance, reach out before you submit the forms.

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