Legal wrangling over DACA continues with judge’s ruling

Immigration has been a primary topic of discussion in recent years. For Pennsylvania residents who are watching the legal back and forth amid political machinations, it can be worrisome as they are unsure as to how they will be impacted by it. One of the most contentious and difficult issues is Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The program allows children who were brought to the United States illegally to remain in the country. However, it is important to pay attention to how the courts are assessing the law and what it might mean to individuals protected by it. Having legal guidance may be essential to be aware of every potential scenario.

Judge says DACA is illegal; appeal is pending

In Texas, a federal judge stated that DACA is illegal. The reasoning behind this is technical as, according to the judge, the Obama administration did not adhere to the administrative requirements. Even with that, the ruling is not going into effect until the Biden administration’s appeal is heard. People who are in the program now will not have their status altered. At the same time, those who wanted to apply for it cannot have their application granted right now. People in the program are referred to as “Dreamers.” The Trump administration had tried to end DACA, but the Supreme Court blocked the attempt.

With DACA, children who were brought to the U.S. by 2007 and were 16 and under at the time can stay in the country. Statistically, these individuals are productive members of society with nine in 10 being employed and around 50% in school. Another challenge is that many never lived in their country of origin and are completely unaware of the language or the customs. Supporters of DACA are seeing this latest ruling as a catalyst for the current administration and congress to finally do something substantive about DACA and help Dreamers with a path to becoming U.S. citizens.

Immigrants concerned about their status should know their rights

This ruling is another in the long line of disputes that immigrants must be concerned with in the context of immigration law. Even with the disputes ongoing, people who are trying to live, study and work in the U.S.; avoid being deported; want to bring family members to the country; would like to bring a fiancé/fiancée or spouse or have other immigration-based legal concerns should know there are options available. Having experienced advice can help to assuage fears and address issues to find workable solutions.

 

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