TPS immigrants shielded from deportation through 2022

On Behalf of | Sep 16, 2021 | Deportation Defense

In Pennsylvania and across the U.S., immigrants are rightfully concerned about laws and policies that were recently attempted and designed to pursue and deport them. However, as a new presidential administration addresses these issues, there is a chance that policy changes will protect certain categories of immigrants. A recent ruling did just that for people from certain countries who were enrolled in the TPS (Temporary Protected Status) program. Those who are part of the program or have family members who are should also be aware of what it means and how it can change in the future.

At least 300,000 people who are from El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Sudan, Nepal and Haiti can now renew their TPS status through the end of 2022. The previous presidential administration had tried to stop people from enrolling. According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the extension adheres to the federal district court orders. Those who are in TPS are not required to pay fees or file applications. The extension will be done automatically with no steps needed from members of the program.

There is ongoing dispute among members of congress and the new presidential administration regarding how far to go in reversing past policies. Some wanted to extend the program for more immigration and not simply extend the rights of those who are already enrolled in TPS. The program is designed to protect people from being deported and allow them to work in the U.S. legally. It is for those whose home countries are wracked by inherent violent activity and natural disasters like earthquakes. Attempts to end the program were stopped by federal lawsuits. A half million Venezuelans benefited from TPS relief this year. People from Myanmar, Yemen, Syria and Somalia were also shielded. In the coming months, those from Hong Kong might be granted relief.

Professional help could still be necessary

Despite these steps, there are concerns about how immigrants can be impacted by the consistent political wrangling regarding immigration. Knowing the factors in preventing deportation is a critical step that should be known from the start. With deportation and other challenges for those who want to come and stay in the U.S., it might be wise to have professional guidance to avoid legal problems that could still come up.

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