Is a marijuana-related crime going to derail your immigration?

On Behalf of | Oct 19, 2021 | Deportation Defense

Although the United States has seemingly relaxed its approach to marijuana, the fact remains that the drug is still illegal under federal law as well as many state laws. This means that those who are accused of drug crimes related to marijuana can have their immigration status negatively impacted.

How can a marijuana-related crime affect your immigration status?

The answer to this question really depends on the facts at hand. For example, many convictions for marijuana-related crimes may result in deportation, unless the crime involves less than 30 grams of marijuana intended for personal use. However, even though lawful permanent residents won’t be deported for possessing less than 30 grams of marijuana, they can be deemed inadmissible, meaning that they cannot legally reenter the country if they travel abroad.

But the consequences of a marijuana-related offense don’t stop there. For example, those immigrants who are required to show good moral character will be unable to do so if they’ve committed a marijuana-related crime. Therefore, they will have to rely on showing good moral character in the timespan following the commission of the crime, which can slow down their immigration process. Even admissions of marijuana use and other marijuana-related crimes, without a formal conviction, can negatively impact an individual’s immigration status.

Carefully navigate your immigration concerns

The immigration process is fraught with complexities, and the statements that you make to immigration and law enforcement officials can be used against you. That’s why it’s a good idea to have assistance when dealing with immigrated-related issues, especially when allegations of criminal wrongdoing are also present. So, if you’re facing these challenges and want to protect your interests as fully as possible, then we encourage you to find the support necessary to carefully and competently work through your immigration issues.

 

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